11-12 / 2000

Lev Detela

Prikaz lastnih zdomskih dramskih poskusov in prizadevanj

Text is published on SLO pages.

11-12 / 2000

Lev Detela

Prikaz lastnih zdomskih dramskih poskusov in prizadevanj

Text is published on SLO pages.

11-12 / 2000

Irena Gantar Godina

6. svetovni kongres Inštituta za ruske in vzhodnoevropske študije na Finskem

Text iz published on SLO pages.

11-12 / 2000

Irena Gantar Godina

6. svetovni kongres Inštituta za ruske in vzhodnoevropske študije na Finskem

Text iz published on SLO pages.

11-12 / 2000

Breda Čebulj Sajko

Dnevi Inštituta za slovensko izseljenstvo (24. maj - 4. junij 2000)

Text is published on SLO pages.

11-12 / 2000

Breda Čebulj Sajko

Dnevi Inštituta za slovensko izseljenstvo (24. maj - 4. junij 2000)

Text is published on SLO pages.

11-12 / 2000

Imre Szilágyi

Central Europe observed from Paris by a Hungarian: Ferenc Fejtő, a thinker with two homelands

The political scientist, journalist and prolific writer Ferenc Fejtő was bom in 1909 in Nagykanizsa in Hungary. Political reasons compelled him to flee the country in 1938 and since then he has lived in France. In 2000 he was awarded the Prix des Ambassadeurs. His book The History of the People s Democracies (1952) was the first to provide an extensive history of the countries of Central and Eastern Europe between 1945 and 1952. In Requiem for a Former Empire he provides a detailed analysis of the political life of Austria-Hungary and the reasons for its decline. Fejtő is an advocate of the idea of Central Europe, of federalism and of meta-nationalism. He believes that the nation is an important constituent of self-awareness and that the national movement of the Slovenes, Croats, Hungarians, etc. is legitimate. His view of nations and sovereignty is very close to theviews of the Slovene intellectuals (Peter Jambrek, France Bučar and Dimitrij Rupel) who wrote on this topic in the late Eighties and early Nineties.

11-12 / 2000

Imre Szilágyi

Central Europe observed from Paris by a Hungarian: Ferenc Fejtő, a thinker with two homelands

The political scientist, journalist and prolific writer Ferenc Fejtő was bom in 1909 in Nagykanizsa in Hungary. Political reasons compelled him to flee the country in 1938 and since then he has lived in France. In 2000 he was awarded the Prix des Ambassadeurs. His book The History of the People s Democracies (1952) was the first to provide an extensive history of the countries of Central and Eastern Europe between 1945 and 1952. In Requiem for a Former Empire he provides a detailed analysis of the political life of Austria-Hungary and the reasons for its decline. Fejtő is an advocate of the idea of Central Europe, of federalism and of meta-nationalism. He believes that the nation is an important constituent of self-awareness and that the national movement of the Slovenes, Croats, Hungarians, etc. is legitimate. His view of nations and sovereignty is very close to theviews of the Slovene intellectuals (Peter Jambrek, France Bučar and Dimitrij Rupel) who wrote on this topic in the late Eighties and early Nineties.

11-12 / 2000

Vera Kržišnik-Bukič

Jakob Žnidaršič’s two homelands

The article attempts to present the personality of Jakob Žnidaršič (1847-1903), a Slovene with two homelands: (at the time informal) Slovenia and Bosnia-Herzegovina. He spent the last 21 years of his life in Sarajevo, where he worked as a teacher of physics and mathematics in a grammar school. Besides his publication of critical essays on Slovene literature and his own literary writing in Slovene and Bosnian newspapers and magazines, his particular historic significance relates to the initiation and foundation of the first Slovene social circle in Sarajevo, called ‘Slovensko omizje’ in the mid 1890s.

11-12 / 2000

Vera Kržišnik-Bukič

Jakob Žnidaršič’s two homelands

The article attempts to present the personality of Jakob Žnidaršič (1847-1903), a Slovene with two homelands: (at the time informal) Slovenia and Bosnia-Herzegovina. He spent the last 21 years of his life in Sarajevo, where he worked as a teacher of physics and mathematics in a grammar school. Besides his publication of critical essays on Slovene literature and his own literary writing in Slovene and Bosnian newspapers and magazines, his particular historic significance relates to the initiation and foundation of the first Slovene social circle in Sarajevo, called ‘Slovensko omizje’ in the mid 1890s.