48 / 2018

Fabio Perocco

Posted Workers between Work Casualisation and the Precarisation of Migration

The article examines the transformations of work, labour casualisation, and the precarisation of migration, deepening the links between these phenomena and the social consequences of their intertwining, such as the double precarity affecting migrant workers, and examining the significance of contemporary migration policies which pave the way for a wider spreading of precarity and which anticipate corresponding labour laws. The article – which considers the European context – focuses on posting of workers as an example of the convergence of the aforementioned processes, and an empirical space for social research in which to test new forms of precarity and stratification, and the transformation of migration policies increasingly focused on the concepts of temporariness and circularity.
KEY WORDS: precarisation, work transformation, migration, posted workers

48 / 2018

Fabio Perocco

Posted Workers between Work Casualisation and the Precarisation of Migration

The article examines the transformations of work, labour casualisation, and the precarisation of migration, deepening the links between these phenomena and the social consequences of their intertwining, such as the double precarity affecting migrant workers, and examining the significance of contemporary migration policies which pave the way for a wider spreading of precarity and which anticipate corresponding labour laws. The article – which considers the European context – focuses on posting of workers as an example of the convergence of the aforementioned processes, and an empirical space for social research in which to test new forms of precarity and stratification, and the transformation of migration policies increasingly focused on the concepts of temporariness and circularity.
KEY WORDS: precarisation, work transformation, migration, posted workers

47 / 2018

Boštjan Zgonc

Book Review - Louis Adamič, Novi svet – ljudje in vizije: Izbrani odlomki iz dvanajstih Adamičevih knjig Mestna knjižnica, Grosuplje, 2015, 343 str.

Book Review is published on SLO pages.

47 / 2018

Boštjan Zgonc

Book Review - Louis Adamič, Novi svet – ljudje in vizije: Izbrani odlomki iz dvanajstih Adamičevih knjig Mestna knjižnica, Grosuplje, 2015, 343 str.

Book Review is published on SLO pages.

47 / 2018

Miha Zobec

Book Review - Ulf Brunnbauer, Globalizing Southeastern Europe: Emigrants, America and the State since the Late Nineteenth Century Lexington Books, Lanham, 2016, 357 str.

Book Review is published on SLO pages.

47 / 2018

Miha Zobec

Book Review - Ulf Brunnbauer, Globalizing Southeastern Europe: Emigrants, America and the State since the Late Nineteenth Century Lexington Books, Lanham, 2016, 357 str.

Book Review is published on SLO pages.

47 / 2018

Laura Boucsein

Book Review - Gabriella Lazaridis, International Migration to Europe: From Subjects to Abjects: Migration, Diasporas and Citizenship Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, pp. 199.

In the context of the growing stigmatization of migrants in Europe and other parts of the world, Gabriella Lazaridis’ book International Migration to Europe: From Subjects to Abjects, published in 2015 by Palgrave Macmillan, is a very timely contribution to the literature. The book examines processes of inclusion and exclusion of migrants in Europe and is explicitly placed in the context of a discourse which increasingly links migration to security concerns.
With the aim of examining and increasing people’s awareness of the exclusion and the “othering” of migrants in Europe, Lazaridis chooses a rights-based approach, theoretically grounded in Arendt’s notion of citizenship as the right to have rights. From this starting point, the author develops four different categories of migrant subjectivities, shaped by the migrants’ respective legal statuses and representing the inclusion-exclusion continuum: subjects, éjectés, injects, and abjects. In her definition, subjects have access to full citizenship rights, whereas éjectés are of a “quasidocumented status”. Injects, having been purposefully “injected” into the receiving country, enjoy a special legal status, and abjects, as irregular migrants, are in the most vulnerable and marginalized situation. Adopting the concept of plastic citizenship as a citizenship which is “fluid, flexible and easily altered by public authorities”, Lazaridis emphasizes that states and supranational entities have the power to grant and deprive migrants of their rights, and thereby contribute to a process of abjectification. In addition to the legal status, Lazaridis examines how different forms of “othering” contribute to the marginalization of migrants, attributing special importance to a new form of racism in shaping migrants’ situations and subjectivities.

47 / 2018

Laura Boucsein

Book Review - Gabriella Lazaridis, International Migration to Europe: From Subjects to Abjects: Migration, Diasporas and Citizenship Palgrave Macmillan, 2015, pp. 199.

In the context of the growing stigmatization of migrants in Europe and other parts of the world, Gabriella Lazaridis’ book International Migration to Europe: From Subjects to Abjects, published in 2015 by Palgrave Macmillan, is a very timely contribution to the literature. The book examines processes of inclusion and exclusion of migrants in Europe and is explicitly placed in the context of a discourse which increasingly links migration to security concerns.
With the aim of examining and increasing people’s awareness of the exclusion and the “othering” of migrants in Europe, Lazaridis chooses a rights-based approach, theoretically grounded in Arendt’s notion of citizenship as the right to have rights. From this starting point, the author develops four different categories of migrant subjectivities, shaped by the migrants’ respective legal statuses and representing the inclusion-exclusion continuum: subjects, éjectés, injects, and abjects. In her definition, subjects have access to full citizenship rights, whereas éjectés are of a “quasidocumented status”. Injects, having been purposefully “injected” into the receiving country, enjoy a special legal status, and abjects, as irregular migrants, are in the most vulnerable and marginalized situation. Adopting the concept of plastic citizenship as a citizenship which is “fluid, flexible and easily altered by public authorities”, Lazaridis emphasizes that states and supranational entities have the power to grant and deprive migrants of their rights, and thereby contribute to a process of abjectification. In addition to the legal status, Lazaridis examines how different forms of “othering” contribute to the marginalization of migrants, attributing special importance to a new form of racism in shaping migrants’ situations and subjectivities.

47 / 2018

Martina Bofulin

On Milk Formula and Diapers: The Entangled Mobilities of People and Objects within Chinese Transnational Spaces

The article addresses multiple mobilities within Chinese transnational spaces by highlighting the circulation of products for children between Chinese migrants and members of their social networks in China. It focuses on the buying, sending and/or selling of milk formula and diapers as a special type of commodity that brings light to the complex relationships of (im)mobile Chinese and draws attention to the role of objects in producing particular types of transnational subjects – migrants as intermedi­a­r­ies between producers outside China and consumers within China. The paper aims to add to the discussion on commodities consumed by children as well as to illustrate what specific objects tell us about diverse experiences of migration. KEY WORDS: milk formula, diapers, Chinese migrants, transnationalism, informal trade

47 / 2018

Martina Bofulin

On Milk Formula and Diapers: The Entangled Mobilities of People and Objects within Chinese Transnational Spaces

The article addresses multiple mobilities within Chinese transnational spaces by highlighting the circulation of products for children between Chinese migrants and members of their social networks in China. It focuses on the buying, sending and/or selling of milk formula and diapers as a special type of commodity that brings light to the complex relationships of (im)mobile Chinese and draws attention to the role of objects in producing particular types of transnational subjects – migrants as intermedi­a­r­ies between producers outside China and consumers within China. The paper aims to add to the discussion on commodities consumed by children as well as to illustrate what specific objects tell us about diverse experiences of migration. KEY WORDS: milk formula, diapers, Chinese migrants, transnationalism, informal trade